How coronavirus changed our connection to exercise

These everyday Victorian women told us what worked, what didn’t, and what they’re looking forward to now restrictions are easing

While stay-at-home restrictions were in place, we asked what our This Girl Can – Victoria ambassadors were doing to stay active at home.

Now that they’re easing, we asked them about their experience with exercise and physical activity throughout the restrictions.

What they told us was that connecting with others is a big part of getting the physical activity they need to feel good.


What worked during restrictions

Connecting online:

  • “Doing an activity like Bollywood dancing with others via Zoom was amazingly uplifting and I felt connected to people,” said Jagriti.
  • Melinda found: “Virtual marathons kept me motivated and moving”.
  • Angela also connected to virtual group activities: “We would all commit to a 5km walk/run/cycle every Saturday and we’d post our photos to share where we had been,” she said.

“We set up the family room and called it the gym. Had fun confusing my hubby by saying we were going to the gym,” said Sue.

  • Sue followed a home fitness program with her daughter: “Having someone to workout with at home kept me motivated,” she said.

Connecting with the local neighbourhood:

  • “Walking with one friend at a time has been an amazing way to reconnect with people I love and just talk and walk,” said Sindi, “we are all usually so busy doing other things together that we don’t get the real conversation very often”.
  • “I set a goal of walking a marathon a week,” said Courtney, “friends who lived close by joined in. We then connected this with a fundraiser virtual walk”.
  • “Restrictions meant shorter rides close to home, however I developed a hack for that. I rode every street in my suburb, and the few surrounding suburbs. Despite a boundary of about 3km square I was able to clock up over 50km just riding in the local streets. The neighbourhood thought I’d gone totally nuts as I rode up and back and round and round,” said Tina.

“I rode every street in my suburb, and the few surrounding suburbs… the neighbourhood thought I’d gone totally nuts,” said Tina.

Knowing that connecting with your body helps you feel good:

  • What worked? “Getting started and actually doing the activity,” said Jagriti, “especially walking and getting some much-needed fresh air. Felt like heaven during lockdown!”
  • “Incorporating more yoga and body weight exercises,” said Tracy, “I will definitely continue doing both of these!”
  • “At the heart of it I think it’s all about This Girl Can,” said Natasha, “as in literally what CAN I actually do inside? Can I walk around the house? Can I go up and down the stairs? Can I put on some music and dance?”

What didn’t work during restrictions

Not having structure and support:

“I struggled. I prefer a team environment… I do better with fixed times, expectations and people,” said Marnie.

  • “I struggled. I prefer a team environment. I’m not good at motivating myself. Also, as a teacher, I was working crazy hours and was so mentally exhausted. Exercise would have been a good solution, but it was often dark or I didn’t make the time. When I worked from home, I would force myself to walk my dogs. That helped…My biggest issue? Not getting my heart rate up and having a consistent schedule. I do better with fixed times, expectations and people,” said Marnie.
  • “I missed the support and accountability of my team,” said Melinda.
  • “I wanted to add more walking but it never happened!” said Sue, “I also wanted to do some online yoga but did a couple of sessions only. I discovered I need to commit to a class time to get things done.”
  • “Using weights at home didn’t work for me,” said Sindi, “cats got in the way often and the bench I was using was slightly too short and I strained my back a little then quit until I can get back to the gym.”

Being hard on yourself (kindness is essential):

  • Angela found that when she wasn’t getting the incidental exercise she was used to before restrictions, “it started to make me feel tired and lethargic. It also made me be quite cruel to myself, and that inner negative voice started to take over. I decided to try to be kinder to myself and replace any negative thought with a positive thought instead. I stopped being so regimental with my exercise and instead decided to be kind. I gave myself the freedom to do what I felt like when I had the time. My life juggling work, kids and online schooling got pretty hectic sometimes so this seemed to work well.”

“I stopped being so regimental with my exercise and instead decided to be kind,” said Angela

  • “At the beginning of isolation I was very motivated so I began doing online workout videos and it was great. Got my heart rate up and really sweaty,” said Dinasha. More recently, she has been busy with her studies, and given herself permission to take it easy: “I’ve sort of taken a step back from working out just allowing myself to be a little lazy. Definitely will be getting back into it though with starting those online workouts and going for walks regularly.”
  • “I come in from a flexible approach,” said Natasha, “if your body really doesn’t want to do the burpee, listen to it and don’t, think about what else your body can/want to do.”

What to look forward to now restrictions are easing

Reconnecting with people, team mates and face-to-face classes:

  • “Getting back to reformer Pilates when the gym reopens. I usually do 3-4 classes a week as I find it helps with my lower back and hip strength reducing chronic lower back pain,” said Sue.
  • “Playing cricket, going swimming and attending fitness classes,” said Dinasha.
  • “Getting back out on the field with my friends and team mates!” said Tracy.
  • “I think everyone is dying to hold a kettlebell haha,” said Natasha.
  • “Dance is back,” said Sindi.
  • “Playing team sports again – touch footy!” said Melinda.
  • “Getting back to cricket training when I can. I miss having a laugh with teammates. I’m also hoping Parkrun might open again soon. In the interim though, at least now I can go running with friends again which has been good for the soul,” said Angela.

Can you relate to what did and didn’t work for our ambassadors during coronavirus restrictions? How about what they’re looking forward to?

We hope you found this inspiring and comforting to hear from these everyday women who volunteered to share their story about getting active as our This Girl Can – Victoria ambassadors.

This Girl Can – Victoria Podcast: Kelly’s Episode

VicHealth’s This Girl Can – Victoria podcast is all about women getting active in their own way and focusing on how good it makes them feel. 

This week in our final episode for season one, we meet Kelly who feels recharged when she gets active

Episode 8: Kelly

Kelly’s a mum of three, and like many parents, put the wellbeing of her kids before her own. 

After the birth of her youngest child, Kelly realised it was time to focus on her own health. Looking after herself first, meant she could better care for her family. 

Self-love is not selfish. It’s love. So it makes me a happier person, which means I’ll be a better person to everyone around me” 

Today, Kelly has a love of Pilates and is part of a netball team made up of a beautiful community of other mums from her children’s school. Not only does this benefit Kelly’s own mental and physical health, but she’s showing her children that anyone – regardless of age or ability – should get active because of how great it makes you feel.

Listen now and subscribe in Apple PodcastsGoogle PodcastsSpotify or wherever you’re listening right now.

This Girl Can - Victoria ambassador Kelly sitting with teammates on the netball grandstand

Catch up on the series 

This is the final episode of our first season of This Girl Can – Victoria podcast. If you’d like to catch up on the previous episodes, simply search for This Girl Can – Victoria wherever you’re listening to podcasts.  

Transcript 

For a full transcript of the podcast, click here.

This Girl Can – Victoria Podcast: Natalie’s Episode

VicHealth’s This Girl Can – Victoria podcast is all about women getting active in their own way 

This week, we meet Natalie who feels a sense of relief when she gets active. 

Episode 7: Natalie 

Natalie has lived in rural Victoria all her life. Being kilometres away from the closest neighbour, to over 30 minutes away from town, the tyranny of distance can have big impacts on physical and mental wellbeing. 

Since moving to Manangatang in Northern Victoria, Natalie has used physical activity as a way to bring women of all ages together. 

I find exercise is a mental release…it’s now more for mental health and keeps me motivated.” 

The birth of her first child 15 years ago left Natalie feeling quite isolated and craving human interaction. What started as a walking group has evolved into a social group that not only get active together, but has built a strong community despite being kilometres apart. 

Listen now and subscribe in Apple PodcastsGoogle PodcastsSpotify or wherever you’re listening right now.

Catch up on the previous episodes

In Episode 6 we met Natasha, a ‘body positive’ personal trainer who sees being physically active as key to living a happy life. Learn how Natasha empowers and inspires her clients to move and celebrate what their bodies can achieve rather than how they look. 

Listen to the previous episodes by searching for This Girl Can – Victoria wherever you’re listening to podcasts.  

Transcript 

For a full transcript of the podcast, click here

Video tips that get women active: now and post-coronavirus

Video tips that get women active: now and post-coronavirus

We’ve already shared tips about moving to online classes, but now that re-opening your doors is in sight, we wanted to share why videos will remain relevant.

Here are two good reasons why creating online videos about your sport or activity will continue to get women active post-coronavirus:

  1. They’re always in demand. Home exercise has been the most visited activity on our website since our campaign launched in 2018, meaning it is a popular option at any time. We knew this when we launched our Get Active @ Home page this year.
  2. Supporting women to get active in your club or activity starts before they get to you. First impressions are often online, and making a video is a great way to introduce women to your club or activity. It also allows them to learn some of the moves and techniques at home, before they’re ready to sign-up.

Remember: our research tells us that more than half of Victorian women worry they’ll be judged on their appearance, ability or priorities when they get active. So being able to give something a go by following along to a video at home may be the bridge that gets women to sign-up.

If you’re going to make a video to get more women active in your program or activity, the below tips can help ensure it’s as welcoming and inspiring as possible.

Top five tips to make videos that will get more women active

Tip one: Make your video look and feel welcoming

Why: Our research tells us that women are more likely to get active when they see people who look like them, and they feel included.

How:

  • Introduce yourself at the beginning of the video, explain what you’ll be doing, and be encouraging in a way that will support beginners.
  • Never retouch or airbrush any women – they are who they are and they’re proud of it! Read our #FITSPO antidote news post for more information.
  • Try and show women of all shapes, sizes and ethnicities in the video.
  • Capture what you love AND hate doing – we understand that training and workouts aren’t always fun. Show yourself/the instructor getting red in the face and think about including bloopers.
  • Wear comfortable everyday clothing to make yourself relatable. A workout should not feel like a fashion shoot. If wearing active wear, try to avoid any prominent branding.

Tip two: make it accessible

Why: Remember our research tells us that women worry they’ll be judged on their ability or because they don’t have the right clothes or equipment to give an activity a shot. If you want to support more women to get active, make sure you are actively trying to include women who are feeling unsure or just starting out.

How:

  • Make more women feel like they have the ability to give your video a go by keeping it beginner-friendly. Always include modified steps/positions for women to try. If there are parts that could be tricky for some people, make sure you acknowledge this (and be encouraging/reassuring for women following along who are still learning).
  • Think about equipment women may already have at hand. Suggest household items that can be used in place of specialised workout equipment to make it easier for women to do the workout right away, without the hurdle of getting the ‘right’ gear beforehand.
  • Add subtitles/closed captions (refer to tip five below) so more women in various circumstances can engage with your video. That includes women who live with deafness, or women who want to watch with the sound off so their family/housemate/sleeping baby doesn’t have to hear it too.

Tip three: Make it clear what the video is about and find good lighting

Why: If it’s easy to find and easy to watch, it is likely to make a good impression.

How:

  • Let women know what you’re doing in the video before they click to watch it, otherwise it might not be clear what to expect (e.g. Boxing? Put this in the video title and show a glove in the preview image. No equipment needed? That’s a headline too!).
  • Find bright natural light or a purpose-built location for filming (and remember to follow physical distancing practices).
  • Before you film, check your background to make sure there is nothing distracting happening behind you.

Tip four: plan your video structure, just as you would plan a face-to-face session

Why: Good structure helps women follow along without having to do too much pausing or rewinding.

How: Consider what sequence and structure will work best by asking yourself questions such as:

  • How long will women need to complete the video? If it is a longer video, add some breaks for water/catching your breath.
  • Is it a video that demonstrates moves and techniques? Think about adding signposts (text on the screen) for sections within the video so it’s easy to watch, practise and re-watch.

See our at home circuit workout video below as an example of good structure.

Tip five: get across the basic ‘tech specs’

Why: Getting the key technical specifications right makes your video more professional and appealing to watch.

How:

  • Eliminate loud background noise and increase the volume of the person speaking. If relevant, include an appropriate soundtrack played softly in the background, but only if you have permission (you can get music from various cheap, royalty-free music sites, like this one).
  • Make sure your camera is stable, in focus and doesn’t shake when you begin jumping around.
  • Avoid using the zoom-in function, flash, and filters. These are best left to professional video editors.
  • Avoid shooting vertical videos – these are great for Instagram Stories, but not for wider distribution.
  • You can cut out mistakes and unsuitable footage using the video editor on your phone or a free online application such as Ezgif.
  • For best results, record ‘4k’ resolution (this means 4,000 pixels and it’s the standard resolution setting for filming) and select the setting for ‘60 fps’ (this means you record 60 frames per second).
  • Use subtitles/closed captions to make your video more accessible (refer to tip two above). Captions should be easy to read: use white writing on a solid background, size 12 font or above, and sentence case (avoid using upper case because it looks like you’re shouting at viewers!).

Videos can support women to get active at any time and following the tips above will help to ensure your videos are welcoming, easy to watch and easy to engage with. For more good examples see our Get Active @ Home page.

For more evidence-based tips on how to get women active, register or login as a Campaign Supporter for access to our step-by-step guide: Getting women to sign up for physical activity.

This Girl Can – Victoria Podcast: Natasha’s Episode

VicHealth’s This Girl Can – Victoria podcast is all about women getting active in their own way 

This week, we meet Natasha who feels completely real when she gets active.

Episode 6: Natasha

Natasha is a ‘body positive’ personal trainer who celebrates the uniqueness of every body.   

By empowering and inspiring her clients to move and celebrate what their bodies can achieve rather than how they look, Natasha sees being physically active as key to living a happy life. 

“Exercise is mental for me. It’s emotional for me. It makes me appreciate what I can do in my body now…and it’s also just nice to connect with one’s physical self.”  

Listen now and subscribe in Apple PodcastsGoogle PodcastsSpotify or wherever you’re listening right now.

This Girl Can ambassador Natasha taking a group exercise class

Missed an episode?

In the previous episode we met with Kirsten who never really enjoyed sports as a child. It wasn’t until she was in her late 20’s that she started to see fitness as more than a means to an end, realising being active was key to her wellbeing and happiness. 

Listen to the previous episodes by searching for This Girl Can – Victoria wherever you’re listening to podcasts

Transcript 

A full transcript of the episode, click here

This Girl Can – Victoria Podcast: Kirsten’s Episode

VicHealth’s This Girl Can – Victoria podcast is all about women getting active in their own way 

This week, we meet Kirsten who feels internally and emotionally healthy when she runs. 

Episode 5: 

With an Aboriginal mother and an African-American father who was in the military, Kirsten grew up all over the world – from Japan, to the United States, to Geraldton in Western Australia. Though it was when she was on Country at Mount Magnet near Geraldton that she felt whole and free. 

Sports weren’t Kirsten’s thing growing up, but she yearned to be outside. It wasn’t until she was in her late 20’s that Kirsten began to focus more on her fitness, helping her realise that being active was key to her wellbeing and happiness.  

Now living in Melbourne, Kirsten and her ‘5am sisters’ get together at least once a week to not only exercise, but to genuinely connect with each other – which is important now more than ever. 

What I get from having a group of women is…motivation, connectiveness and also realness. We have real conversations…we cheer each other on in everyday life

Listen now and subscribe in Apple PodcastsGoogle PodcastsSpotify or wherever you’re listening right now.

group of women running

Missed an episode?

You can catch up on the previous episodes wherever you’re listening to podcasts.  

Last week in Episode 4, we heard from Rocca whose love for music and dance led her to starting a Para-dance group. It’s a place where women in wheelchairs come together to feel the connection of being part of a group, free of judgement and see their wheelchairs in a new light – not just as a tool for transportation, but as a partner. 

Transcript 

A full transcript of the episode, click here

This Girl Can – Victoria Podcast: Rocca’s Episode

VicHealth’s This Girl Can – Victoria podcast is all about women who are giving it a go without judgement 

This week, we meet Rocca who feels happy when she dances. 

Episode 4:  

Rocca’s passion for dance is in her DNA. Growing up in Colombia, music and dance was a huge part of her upbringing, and it wasn’t long until her Mum and Auntie’s love of dance rubbed off on Rocca.   

After moving to Australia to study at University, the unthinkable happened when Rocca was hit by a car and she has been in a wheelchair ever since.  

I think life is mysterious…amazing…beautiful. And I don’t want to waste any moment of my life. I want to use absolutely every moment to do the things that I love, and that includes sports and being active.

Listen now and subscribe in Apple PodcastsGoogle PodcastsSpotify or wherever you’re listening right now.

During rehab Rocca discovered wheelchair tennis and came to the realisation that her wheelchair wasn’t an obstacle for her to live a happy, active life.  

This realisation combined with her love for music and dance led Rocca to starting a Para-dance group. It’s a place where women in wheelchairs come together to feel the connection of being part of a group, free of judgement and see their wheelchairs in a new light – not just as a tool for transportation, but as a partner.  

Rocca in a dance class with 4 other women

Catch up on the previous episode  

Last week in Episode 3, we heard from Sue who reflects on her early love of  football and the importance of focusing on her own wellbeing, realising that it’s never too late to find your physical activity passion. 

Listen to Episode 3 or search for This Girl Can – Victoria wherever you’re listening to podcasts.  

Transcript 

A full transcript of the episode, click here

Have a coronavirus question?  

For all coronavirus questions visit www.coronavirus.vic.gov.au or call the Victorian Department of Health and Human Services (DHHS) hotline on 1800 020 080. 

Online classes continue to grow, so now’s the time to jump on board

With Victorian communities relying on the digital world for exercise classes and activities, it’s a great time to think about how you can move your own events online and we’re here to help you maximise their success.

Learn from others!

To help you kickstart your planning, we spoke to Lauren Foote from Darebin City Council to hear how they created online classes for their community to increase activity, promote health and ensure there were opportunities for social connection during the coronavirus pandemic. And spoiler alert, they nailed it! 

https://www.facebook.com/1538799073074350/videos/225242758893077/

Presented by Sifu Lily Liang for JinLi-Wushu Tai Chi https://www.jinli.com.au/

See what their members are saying in the comments

Transitioning online isn’t a simple copy and paste

When creating online content, you have amazing opportunities to think creatively and don’t need to follow the same steps as creating physical events. 

Here’s what Darebin City Council considered when planning their online activities: 

  • Who is the target audience – It is vital to consider who uses online technology. You may not be able to reach individuals who don’t have internet access or don’t use social media. Darebin City Council acknowledged this and reshaped their target audience and made separate plans to address those key population groups like older adults and lower socioeconomic populations with paper-based workouts. 
  • Budget – When speaking to suppliers it’s important to factor in time for uploading and editing content. Lauren said they planned for any technical issues which could have resulted in higher costs. 
  • What activities will work online and who should present them – Not every activity will work online, so it’s important to look at what will work best and who will bring enthusiasm and positivity that will translate through a screen. 
  • Which format is right for you –Darebin City Council used Facebook to share videos and gave their instructors temporary access so they could stream directly from their house. However, there are many ways to deliver videos online. If you want a large audience, Facebook Live is a great way to get many people involved at once. You can also pre-record videos and house them on your website or post them to YouTube. You can see some examples on the This Girl Can – Victoria website here
  • Support your instructor and get them prepared –Just like any presenter, the key to a great performance is practice and planning, even if it is digital. Darebin City Council provided an online guide to explain how to stream activities on Facebook Live, and created a test group for practising. Lauren also gave instructors the option to record classes from their own homes, or from Reservoir Leisure Centre (while ensuring they practised physical distancing). 

Lauren shared some of the other key challenges and successes from Darebin City Council which can help you when you start your planning: 

Get your event #trending  

Firstly, create a Facebook event and make This Girl Can – Victoria a co-host, to immediately reach more than 16,000 Victorian women. You can learn how to do that here and once accepted, your event will be listed on our Facebook page and the Online Events page of the This Girl Can – Victoria website. Creating a Facebook event listing enables you to promote it and allows time for people to mark their calendars. Darebin City Council used their guest instructors to gain more interest and increase registrations.  

Trust us, your community will love this! 

This Girl Can – Victoria recognised that when the boom of online classes started, there was a real lack of diversity in both instructors, classes and fitness levels. As a council or sports club, you can tap into this market and provide the community with content that they will love and greatly benefit from. It also provides another way for women to connect through physical activity.  

Darebin City Council reflected on what success would look like and acknowledged attendance is key but also the positive feedback they received from the community reiterated the value of online community-based content.  

We can’t wait to co-host your events and share them with the This Girl Can Community! 

Have a coronavirus question?  

For all coronavirus questions visit  www.coronavirus.vic.gov.au or call the Victorian Department of Health and Human Services (DHHS) hotline on 1800 020 080. 

This Girl Can – Victoria Podcast: Sue’s episode

VicHealth’s new This Girl Can – Victoria podcast is all about women who are giving it a go and getting active no matter how well they do it, how they look or how sweaty they get

This week, we meet Sue who feels liberated when she plays football.

Episode 3: Sue

“It’s never too late to try something new. It’s never too late to get up, get active and have fun.” 

Sue has always loved footy. Growing up in the 70s, Sue dreamt of playing footy with the boys. Society had other ideas when she was told she couldn’t play because she was a girl.  

It wasn’t until Sue’s two kids were well into primary school that she decided to focus on her own wellbeing by revisiting her physical activity dreams.  

“I thought, this is my chance. I’m 53. If I don’t do this now, I will never, ever get the opportunity again and I’ll regret it.” 

This Girl Can ambassador Sue playing football

In the podcast, Sue reflects on her early love of football and the importance of focusing on her own wellbeing. Be taken on a journey through the twists and turns of Sue’s life, leading her to the realisation that it’s never too late to find what you love to do and follow your physical activity passion. 

Listen now and subscribe in Apple PodcastsGoogle PodcastsSpotify or wherever you’re listening right now.

Missed the previous episodes?  

In Episode 1, Jag shared her love for Bollywood dancing, how it makes her feel, and the ups and downs she’s faced. 

In Episode 2, we heard from Karen who shares the story of the joyous release that being physical gives her, finding her new physical abilities, sexuality and motherhood. 

Listen to Episode 1 and Episode 2 or search for This Girl Can – Victoria wherever you’re listening to podcasts. 

Transcript

For a full transcript of the podcast, click here

Have a coronavirus question?

For all coronavirus questions visit www.coronavirus.vic.gov.au or call the Victorian Department of Health and Human Services (DHHS) hotline on 1800 020 080.

staying apart keeps us together graphic from DHHS

#FITSPO fatigue? Try these home exercise videos instead

VicHealth’s This Girl Can – Victoria campaign has launched a new home exercise video platform as an antidote to the #FITSPO workouts flooding YouTube and Instagram

The new Get Active @ Home page provides exercise videos that focus on feeling good, not looking good, at a time when they’re sorely needed.

With #FITSPO content dominating search results, we know from our research there’s a risk many of us will be put off getting the physical activity we need to feel healthy and well during the coronavirus pandemic.

Research backs the need for anti-#FITSPO options

Our research from March this year told us that not only are most Victorian women turned off exercise when they see taut and toned #FITSPO influencers. Many of them also end up feeling bad or inadequate about their own bodies and fitness.

And if they’re looking to exercise as a way to feel better while they’re staying home during the coronavirus, feeling inadequate isn’t a great starting point.

The good news is that our research provided the answer: images and videos of everyday women with a wide range of body shapes have the opposite effect. They encourage women, rather than turning them off.

This Girl Can - Victoria ambassador Sarah stretching while doing yoga

So the new Get Active @ Home page features a growing selection of home exercise videos from women of different ages, fitness levels, shapes and sizes getting active.

The one thing they all have in common is they’re designed to help you feel good, not look a certain way.

Check out some of the first videos on the Get Active @ Home website so you can move your body and feel good.

Try a Get Active @ Home video for your next workout

Get Active @ Home is all about moving your body to feel good.

This is the opposite of #FITSPO, so it doesn’t matter how red and sweaty your face gets, all that matters is you’re giving it a go.

Below is a sneak peek of two of the workout videos uploaded so far. Both videos are delivered by Natasha, a qualified personal trainer and one of our This Girl Can – Victoria ambassadors.

Workouts with Natasha: This Girl Can – Victoria ambassador and qualified personal trainer

Chair-based workout

Natasha’s chair-based workout guides people at home through a full workout you can do sitting down. This includes a warm-up for your shoulders and arms, and a series of circuits using household objects as weights instead of special equipment.

This Girl Can - Victoria ambassador Natasha demonstrating her chair workout

Circuit workout with modifications for different abilities and fitness levels

In this circuit workout Natasha provides different options to suit different bodies! Below you can see her modified star jump, for people who feel better without the ‘jump’ part.

This Girl Can - Victoria ambassador Natasha demonstrating her home circuit workout

Inspired to give one (or both!) of these home exercise videos a go? See both of Natasha’s videos here.

If you’re feeling #FITSPO-fatigued and ready for an inclusive, feel-good workout video to help you exercise at home, keep an eye on the Get Active @ Home page on the This Girl Can – Victoria website to see new video inspiration.

Have a coronavirus question?

For all coronavirus questions visit www.coronavirus.vic.gov.au or call the Victorian Department of Health and Human Services (DHHS) hotline on 1800 020 080.

If you think you have coronavirus, get tested today